Storytelling with Minion Comics

With the new Minions movie opening today, there has been a surge of Minion everything the last few months. Titan Comics has created Minion comics to give the Minion fan more stories of mischief and silliness. The comics have been a hit with my four year old son as the pages have minimal text (most with no text at all) and an art style that depicts the Minions in a new way. Here is a sample:

Minions Comics

The real value of the comic is that it inspires storytelling from my son, and it could for any emerging reader. When we first started looking at these comics, I just needed to help with sequencing by pointing to a panel and asking “what is happening here?” and my son would give me his version of the story. My son had to depend on the facial expression to try and piece together a story (plus it led to some discussions on emotions as well). Soon, my son had the sequence of a comic page down and he was weaving his own Minion stories based on the visuals. At times he would create a story with so much detail, in regards to what he thought the Minion was thinking, that it left me amazed. Best of all, he will grab his comic on his own (when it’s not reading time) and just sit and look at the visuals and come up to me and tell me a Minion story. It’s a step in the right direction in creating a lifelong reader.

These comics are great for teaching the basic sequence of a comic and allowing a pre-reader to create their own stories. Most of the stories are contained to a single page in the comic, which gives the reader many different stories within one comic book. The Minions comics have been a great addition to our summer reading list.

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Marvel Comics Unlimited

Marvel-Comics

For a limited time, Marvel Comics Unlimited is offering one month of their digital comics service for 99 cents (Use code SDCC14 at checkout). Once the month is up, the monthly price goes up to $9.99. The digital comics service is great for the classroom as it gives access to thousands of comics which can be integrated into instruction. Looking to draw allusions to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde? A few choice panels from the Incredible Hulk series would illustrate the point with a familiar character. Mythology is easier to introduce to students when you look at Norse mythology and discuss Odin and Thor before delving into some more complex myths. Marvel Comics Unlimited offers so many comics and provides a wealth of opportunities to incorporate these characters and their stories in the classroom. For 99 cents, it’s a great opportunity to check out the service and evaluate its usefulness for your classroom.

More information: http://www.wired.com/2014/07/marvel-comics-unlimited/

First Donors Choose Project

Donors Choose Project1

My first ever Donors Choose project was officially posted yesterday. The project is the first step I’m taking in creating a classroom library of graphic novels for my students. You can check out the full details of the project here. I want to thank all those that have taken the time to view to the project and those that have already donated.

UPDATE: My project was fully funded! I was not expecting that so soon. A huge thank you to all that helped fund the project. My students will be grateful.

 

Getting Organized

Before
Before

The summer is quickly winding down, but I was able to accomplish one huge task before I head back to school. In the hopes of having a better library of comics at my disposal, I finally organized the great mess that was my comic collection. Over the past year, I have been regularly collecting, but I wasn’t keeping up with reading them all as I worked on my master’s degree. Thus, I had a lot of comics randomly stuffed in my comic boxes.

I used the site Comic Book Database to keep a digital record of my comics. The site is easy to use and provides a multitude of reports to keep track of your collection and wishlist. As I add issues to my collection, the site will automatically organize it alphabetically. I can also save a digital copy of my collection (in Excel format) and have a handy reference of my collection.

After
After

In regards to the classroom, this helps me know what comics I have available when I think of a way to incorporate my comics in class. Not all are suitable for the classroom, but at least I now know exactly what I have in my collection. Now I just need to catch up on reading all of them.